JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
OCTOBER 2018
D-P25 (NP)

Signalment (JPC # 2188162):  21-month-old male Persian cat

HISTORY:  This cat had a history of watery ocular discharge with intermittent periods of anorexia and vomiting.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Stomach, pylorus:  Diffusely, the mucosa is thickened up to 2mm by hyperplastic gastric epithelium that forms tortuous, convoluted glands. Hyperplastic gastric pits are lined by abundant mucous neck cells that pile up to 5 cell layers thick and have frequent mitotic figures (mucous neck cell hyperplasia). Multifocally, pyloric glands are lost and replaced by fibrous connective tissue.  Remaining pyloric glands are either tortuous and dilated with luminal sloughed epithelial cells and necrotic debris or are lined by basophilic cuboidal cells that pile up to 2-3 cell layers thick, have vesiculate nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and increased mitotic figures (regeneration).  There are low to moderate numbers of lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, and eosinophils within the lamina propria.  There are many adult nematodes within the lumen, gastric pits, and attenuated pyloric glands.  These nematodes are 30um in diameter and have a 2 um thick cuticle with numerous, evenly-spaced, longitudinal, cuticular ridges; platymyarian-meromyarian musculature; and a pseudocoelom containing a poorly discernible intestine and reproductive tract.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Stomach, pylorus:  Gastritis, proliferative, chronic, diffuse, moderate, with fibrosis and luminal and intraglandular nematodes, Persian, feline.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Gastric trichostrongyliasis

CAUSEOllulanus tricuspis

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

LIFE CYCLE:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

Gastric nematodes of the cat:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

Ollulanus tricuspis in other species:

Other trichostrongyles: 

REFERENCES:

  1. Gardiner CH, Poynton SL. An Atlas of Metazoan Parasites in Animal Tissues. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology;1999:22-25.
  2. Gelberg HB. Alimentary system and the peritoneum, omentum, mesentery, and peritoneal vacity. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:363, 400, 406.
  3. Strait K, Else JG, Eberhard ML. Parasitic diseases of nonhuman primates.  In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardiff S, Morris T, eds.  Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases, Vol. 2.  2nd ed.  Waltham, MA: Academic Press; 2012:233-235.
  4. Terio KA, McAloose D, Mitchell E.   In:  Terio KA, McAloose D, St. Leger J.  Pathology of Wildlife and Zoo Animals.  London, England: Elsevier; 2018:278.
  5. Uzal FA, Plattner BL, Hostetter JM. Alimentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: 54-55, 211.


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