JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
August 2018
D-B05

SIGNALMENT (JPC # 2548132): 6-day-old male crossbred lamb

HISTORY:  This lamb was weak

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION: Liver: Affecting approximately 60% of the liver are multifocal to coalescing, random, 1-3 mm diameter circular areas of hepatic parenchyma that have retention of cellular detail and loss of differential staining (coagulative necrosis).  The foci are rimmed by eosinophilic and karyorrhectic debris, necrotic leukocytes, basophilic fragmented material (mineral), and numerous radiating colonies of 1 um wide basophilic, extracellular, filamentous bacilli.  Hepatic cords surrounding necrotic areas are frequently discontinuous with individualization of hepatocytes that are swollen and vacuolated (degeneration) or shrunken with a scant amount of hypereosinphilic cytoplasm and a pyknotic nucleus (necrosis).  Multifocally, sinusoids are dilated up to three times by blood (congestion).

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS: Liver: Necrosis, coagulative, acute, multifocal-random, moderate with filamentous bacilli, etiology consistent with Fusobacterium necrophorum, crossbred sheep, ovine. 

CAUSE: Fusobacterium necrophorum

CONDITION: Hepatic necrobacillosis 

GENERAL DISCUSSION:  

PATHOGENESIS: 

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS: 

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS: 

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS: 

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: 

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: 

Sheep and cattle: Multifocal random hepatic necrosis (hepatocellular necrosis)

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY: 

Other Diseases/Lesions Caused by F. necrophorum

References:

  1. Brooks JW, Kumar A, Narayanan S, Myers S, Brown K, Nagaraja TG, Jayarao BM. Characterization of Fusobacterium isolates from the respiratory tract of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). J Vet Diagn Invest. 2014 Mar;26(2):213-20.
  2. Brown DL, Van Wettere AJV, Cullen JM. Hepatobiliary system and exocrine pancreas. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:442.
  3. Cullen JM, Stalker MJ. Liver and biliary system.  In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:316.
  4. Gelberg HB. Alimentary system and the peritoneum, omentum, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:347-348, 393.
  5. Maudlin EA, Peters-Kennedy J. Integumentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: 643.
  6. Kramer JA, Bielitzki J. Integumentary System Diseases of Nonhuman Primates. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases. 2nd ed. San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2012: 572.
  7. Kumar A, Anderson D, Raghavendra G, et al. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.  J Vet Diagn Invest. 2013; 25(4):502-507.
  8. Hargis AM, Myers S. The Integument. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier; 2016: 1119, 1126.
  9. Uzal FA, Plattner BL, Hostetter JM. Alimentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:17, 39, 41.
  10. Zachary JF. Mechanisms of microbial infections. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:175.


Click the slide to view.



Click on image for diagnostic series.



Back | Home | Contact Us | Links | Help |