JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
September 2018
D-M01

SIGNALMENT A (AFIP # 1619733):  Adult cat

HISTORY A:  Long-standing ulcerated lesion was removed surgically from the mouth

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION: D-M01A:  Oral mucosa (per contributor):  Affecting 60% of submucosal tissue is a focally extensive area of the subepithelial connective tissue, subjacent to the overlying hyperplastic epithelium, which is edematous and composed of  numerous eosinophils, with fewer neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells, mast cells, and reactive fibroblasts that surround and separate bundles of collagen. Intensely hypereosinophilic material is fragmented, granular and surrounded by amphophilic to basophilic debris creating a highly eosinophilic center (“flame” appearance), surrounded by basophilic macrophages and multinucleate giant cells, including both Langhans and foreign body type (flame figures).  Lymphatic vessels are mildly dilated (edema) and blood vessels are often lined by plump, reactive endothelial cells.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Oral mucosa (per contributor):  Eosinophilic granulomas, focally extensive, moderate, with flame figures, breed unspecified, feline.

CONDITION: Feline oral eosinophilic granuloma

SIGNALMENT B (AFIP #2648048):  1-year-old female Siberian husky

HISTORY B:  Mass on the frenulum of the tongue

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION: D-M01B:  Oral mucosa (per contributor): Expanding the lamina propria and elevating the overlying multifocally eroded and ulcerated epithelium is a sessile mass that contains multifocal to coalescing nodular aggregates of numerous eosinophils, with fewer neutrophils, epithelioid macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells, mast cells, foreign body type multinucleated giant cells, and reactive fibroblasts that surround and separate bundles of collagen which is admixed with necrotic debris, edema and rare colonies of 1-2um cocci.  Intensely eosinophilic material is fragmented, granular, and disrupted by amphophilic to basophilic debris surrounded by basophilic macrophages and multinucleated giant cells (flame figures).  The background consists of many reactive fibroblasts and dense fibrosis surrounded by clear space and ectatic lymphatics (edema) with many small caliber blood vessels lined by reactive endothelium (granulation tissue).  The mucosa is multifocally ulcerated with a moderate number of transmigrating neutrophils.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Oral mucosa (per contributor):  Eosinophilic granulomas, multifocal to coalescing, severe, with flame figures, multifocal ulceration, granulation tissue and rare bacterial colonies, Siberian husky, canine.

CONDITION: Canine oral eosinophilic granuloma

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

Feline eosinophilic granuloma complex includes lesions affecting the skin, mucocutaneous junctions and oral cavity of cats

Canine eosinophilic granulomas are rare in dogs, occur the oral cavity or rarely the skin, primarily affecting Siberian huskies and sporadically Cavalier King Charles spaniels.

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

Feline eosinophilic granuloma complex:

Canine oral eosinophilic granuloma:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

Feline eosinophilic granuloma complex:

Canine oral eosinophilic granuloma:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

Feline eosinophilic granuloma complex:

Canine eosinophilic granuloma: Diffuse dermal eosinophilic inflammation within which are foci of degranulating eosinophils sometimes surrounded by epithelioid macrophages; overlying epithelium or epidermis may be acanthotic or ulcerated

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

For gross lesions in the oral cavity of cats:

For gross lesions in the oral cavity of dogs:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY

REFERENCES:

  1. Ackermann, MR. Inflammation and healing. In: McGavin MD, Zachary JF, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:111.
  2. Bardagi M, Fondati A, Fondevila D, Ferrer L. Ultrastructural study of cutaneous lesions in feline eosinophilic granuloma complex. Vet Dermatol. 2003;14:297-303.
  3. Bloom PB. Canine and feline eosinophilic skin diseases. Vet Clin North Amer Sm Animal. 2006;36(1):141-160.
  4. Fondati A, Fondevila D, Ferrer L. Histopathological study of feline eosinophilic dermatoses. Vet Dermatol 2001:12:333-338.
  5. Gelberg, HB. Alimentary system and the peritoneum, omentum, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. In: McGavin MD, Zachary JF, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:348.
  6. Mauldin EA, Peters-Kennedy J. Integumentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:693-695.
  7. Nodular and diffuse diseases of the dermis with prominent eosinophils, neutrophils, or plasma cells. In: Gross TL, Ihrke, PJ, Walder EJ, Affolter VK, eds. Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 2nd ed. Ames, Iowa: Blackwell Science Ltd; 2005:352-359.


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