JPCSYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY

INTEGUMENT SYSTEM

October 2016

I-P06

 

Signalment (JPC #21474-15):  A young dog

HISTORY: This dog presented with a generalized alopecic and pruritic skin condition.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Haired skin:  Diffusely, the epidermis is thickened up to 0.5 mm with acanthosis, prominent rete ridge formation, spongiosis, and multifocal orthokeratotic and parakeratotic hyperkeratosis with embedded adult arthropods and eggs.  Occupying the stratum corneum, occasionally within tunnels, adult arthropods are ovoid, 200-300 x 100-150 um in diameter, and possess a spiny chitinous exoskeleton, jointed appendages, striated muscle, a body cavity (hemocoel), and intestinal and reproductive structures.  The eggs are oval, thin-shelled, and 70 x 40 um in diameter.  Multifocally there are intracorneal pustules containing degenerate neutrophils, necrotic cellular debris and proteinaceous fluid.  Diffusely the superficial dermis is expanded by clear space (edema) and few lymphocytes, plasma cells, neutrophils and eosinophils.  There are few ectatic hair follicles. 

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Haired skin:  Epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, diffuse, marked, with mild eosinophilic dermatitis and numerous intracorneal mites, etiology consistent with Sarcoptes scabiei, breed unspecified, canine.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Sarcoptic dermatitis

CAUSESarcoptes scabiei var. canis

CONDITION:  Sarcoptic mange

CONDITION SYNONYM:  Canine scabies

GENERAL DISCUSSION

PATHOGENESIS: 

LIFE CYCLE

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY

REFERENCES:

  1. Cargill C, Davies PR. In: External parasites. Straw BE, Zimmerman JJ, D’Allaire S, Taylor DJ, eds. Diseases of Swine. 9th ed. Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing; 2006: 875-882.
  2. Cypher BL, Rudd JL, Westall TL. et al. Sarcoptic mange in endangered kit foxes (Vulpes marcotis mutica): Case histories, diagnoses, and implications for conservation. J Wildl Dis. 2016; Sep. 25:Epub ahead of print.
  3. Gold RM, Schneider S, et al. Pathology in practice. A coyote with sarcoptic mange. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2015; 246(1):63-65.
  4. Gross TL, Ihrke PJ, Walder EJ, Affolter VK. Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 2nd ed. Ames, IA: Blackwell; 2005: 216-219.
  5. Hargis AM, Myers S. The integument. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:1086.
  6. Jimenez MD, Bangs EE, Sime C, Asher VJ. Sarcoptic mange found in wolves in the Rocky Mountains in western United States. J Wildl Dis. 2010; 46(4):1120-1125.
  7. Mauldin E, Peters-Kennedy J. Integumentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA:Elsevier; 2016:673-680.
  8. Nimmervoll H, Hoby S, Robert N, Lommano E, Welle M, Ryser-Degiorgis MP. Pathology of sarcoptic mange in red foxes  (Vulpes vulpes): macroscopic and histologic characterization of three disease stages.  J Wildl Dis. 2013:49(1):91-102.
  9. Percy DH, Barthold SW. Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 4th Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing; 2016: 238, 303-304.
  10. Perez JM, Serrano E. et al. Distinguishing disease effects from environmental effects in a mountain ungulate: Seasonal variation in body weight, hematology, and serum chemistry among Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) affected by sarcoptic mange. J Wildl Dis. 2015; 51(1):148-156.
  11. Radostits OM, Gay CC, Blood DC, Hinchcliff KW, Constable PD. Diseases associated with arthropod parasites. In: Veterinary Medicine: A Textbook of the Diseases of Cattle, Sheep, Pigs, Goats and Horses. 10th ed. Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA, 2007: 1608-1609.
  12. Scott DW, Miller WH, Griffin CE. Parasitic skin diseases. Muller & Kirk’s Small Animal Dermatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Co., 2001: 476-485.


Click the slide to view.



Click on image for diagnostic series.



Back | Home | Contact Us | Links | Help |