JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
HEMOLYMPHATIC SYSTEM
March 2018
H-B02

Signalment (AFIP #1618601): Guinea pig

HISTORY:  Cervical (neck) swellings

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Lymph node:  Effacing and replacing approximately 95% of lymphoid architecture is an extensive abscess composed of numerous degenerate heterophils, fewer macrophages, and rare lymphocytes and plasma cells admixed with abundant eosinophilic cellular and karyorrhectic debris (lytic necrosis) surrounded by an up to 2 mm thick fibrous capsule. Multifocally the abscess extends through the capsule and infiltrates adjacent adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.  The subcapsular and medullary sinuses in the adjacent normal remaining lymph node are mildy expanded by edema.   

Salivary gland:  Diffusely within the adjacent salivary gland, there is acinar atrophy, characterized by clusters of closely-spaced ducts and few intervening glands, as well as moderate fatty infiltration admixed with few lymphocytes and plasma cells.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  1) Cervical lymph node:  Lymphadenitis, necrosuppurative, chronic, diffuse, severe (abscess), with suppurative steatitis and myositis, guinea pig (Cavia porcellus), rodent.

2) Salivary gland: Acinar atrophy, diffuse, mild to moderate.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Streptococcal lymphadenitis

CAUSE:  Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

CONDITION:  Cervical lymphadenitis, “Lumps”

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

For cervical lymphadenitis

For acute septicemic disease

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Aldred P, Hill AC, Young C. The isolation of Streptobacillus moniliformis from cervical abscesses of guinea-pigs. Lab Anim. 1974;8:275-277.
  2. Barthold SW, Griffey SM, Percy DH. Guinea pig. In: Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 4th ed. Ames, IA: Wiley Blackwell; 2016:229-230.
  3. Bemis DA, Johnson BH, Bryant MJ, et al. Isolation and identification of Caviibacter abscessus from cervical abscesses in a series of pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).  J Vet Diagn Invest.  2016 ;28(6):763-769.
  4. Brabb T, Newsome D, Burich A, Hanes M. Guinea pigs, infectious diseases.  Suckow, MA, Stevens KA, Wilson RP, eds.  The Laboratory Rabbit, Guinea Pig, Hamster and Other Rodents.  1st ed.  Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2012:649-630.
  5. Erol E, Locke SJ, Donahoe JK, Mackin MA, Carter CN. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus from horses: a retrospective study (2000-2010). J Vet Diagn Invest. 2012;24:142-147.
  6. Fleming MP. Streptobacillus moniliformis isolations from cervical abscesses of guinea-pigs. Vet Rec. 1976;99:256.
  7. Ganaway JR. Bacterial, mycoplasma, and rickettsial diseases. In: Wagner JE, Manning PJ, eds. The Biology of the Guinea Pig. New York: Academic Press; 1976: 123-124.
  8. Harkness JE, Murray KA, Wagner JE. Biology and diseases of guinea pigs. In: Fox JG, Anderson LC, Loew FM, Quimby FW, eds. Laboratory Animal Medicine. 2nd ed. San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2002:213-215.
  9. Murphy JC, Ackerman JI, Marini RP, Fox JG. Cervical lymphadenitis in guinea pigs: infection via intact ocular and nasal mucosa by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Lab Anim Sci. 1991;41:251-254.
  10. Hawkins MG, Bishop CR. Disease problems of guinea pigs. In: Quesenberry KE, Carpenter JW, eds. Ferrets, Rabbits, and Rodents Clinical Medicine and Surgery.  3rd ed.   Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2012:304.
  11. Olson LD, Schueler RL, Riley GM, Morehouse LG. Experimental induction of cervical lymphadenitis in guinea-pigs with group C streptococci. Lab Anim. 1976;10:223-231.
  12. Sura R, Hinckley LS, Risatti GR, Smyth JA. Fatal necrotising fasciitis and myositis in a cat associated with Streptococcus canis. Vet Rec. 2008;162:450-453.

 

 


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