JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
December 2018
D-V24

SIGNALMENT (JPC #2047475):  An adult male Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

HISTORY:  None

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Small intestine: Circumferentially affecting 90% of the section, markedly expanding the serosa and infiltrating the tunica muscularis, submucosa are multiple nodular, unencapsulated, densely cellular masses composed of spindle to stellate cells arranged in interlacing to haphazardly arranged bundles, streams, and perivascular whorls supported by fibrovascular stroma. The cells have indistinct borders, moderate amounts of amphophilic to eosinophilic fibrillar cytoplasm, and plump, oval to stellate, vesicular nuclei with 0-1 nucleolus. Mitoses average 1 per 10 HPFs.  Multifocally, there are few lymphocytes, plasma cells and rare neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as numerous small caliber blood vessels. The submucosa is multifocally infiltrated by similar inflammatory cells and few macrophages, and is edematous, with increased numbers of dilated lymphatics (edema).

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Small intestine, serosa: Atypical mesenchymal proliferation, multinodular (retroperitoneal fibromatosis), Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), nonhuman primate.

CAUSE:  Simian retrovirus type D serotype 2 (SRV-2) & retroperitoneal fibromatosis associated herpes virus (RFHV) (gammaherpesvirus, Rhadinovirus)

GENERAL DISCUSSION: 

PATHOGENESIS: 

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS: 

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS: 

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS: 

ULTRASTRUCTURAL FINDINGS:

DIAGNOSIS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: 

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY: 

REFERENCES:

  1. Bailey C, Mansfield K. Emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of nonhuman pirmtes in the laboratory setting. Vet Pathol. 2010 May;47(3):462-81.
  2. Cheville NF. Type D oncoviruses. In: Ultrastructural Pathology: An Introduction to Interpretation. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press; 1994: 579-581.
  3. Fikes JD, O’Sullivan MG. Localized retroperitoneal fibromatosis causing intestinal obstruction in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Vet Pathol. 1995; 32(6):713-716.
  4. Giddens WE, Tsai CC, Morton WR, Ochs HD, Knitter GH, Blakley GA. Retroperitoneal fibromatosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in macaques: Pathologic observations and transmission studies. Am J Pathol. 1985; 119(2):253-263.
  5. King NW. Simian models of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): a review. Vet Pathol. 1986; 23:345-353.
  6. Lowenstein LJ. Type D retrovirus infection, macaques. In: Jones TC, Mohr U, Hunt RD, eds. Nonhuman Primates I. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag; 1993: 20-32.
  7. Miller AD. Neoplastic and Proliferative Disorders of Nonhuman Primates. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, et al. eds. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases. Volume 2, 2nd ed. Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2012: 332.
  8. Pritzker KPH, Kessler MJ. Arthritis, Muscle, Adipose Tissue, and Bone Diseases of Nonhuman Primates. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, et al. eds. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases. Vol 2; 2nd ed. Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2012: 652-653.
  9. Tsai CC, Warner T, Uno H, Giddens WE, Ochs HD. Subcutaneous fibromatosis associated with an acquired immune deficiency syndrome in pig-tailed macaques. Am J Pathol. 1985; 120(1):30-37.
  10. Wachtman L, Mansfield K. Viral diseases of non-human primates. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardiff S, Morris T, eds. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research Diseases. Volume 2;2nd ed. Waltham, MA: Academic Press, 2012: 24-25.


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