JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

September 2017

P-P16

 

Signalment (JPC #1711212):  Herring gull

HISTORY:  Unknown

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Trachea:  The mucosal epithelium is thickened up to five cell layers thick by disorganized epithelial cells that have enlarged, often vesiculate nuclei (hyperplasia) and increased numbers of goblet cells.  Multifocally, overlying the epithelium is a thin layer of eosinophilic, finely fibrillar material (fibrin).  Within the lumen, there are sloughed epithelial cells and multiple cross sections of adult nematodes that measure up to 500 um in diameter with a 1 um, smooth cuticle, a pseudocoelom lined by platymyarian-meromyarian musculature, an intestine lined by few multinucleated cells with a prominent brush border, and several sections of ovaries and uteri containing developing eggs. Diffusely, the subepithelial connective tissue is markedly expanded by moderate amounts of clear space (edema), moderate numbers of lymphocytes and plasma cells, fewer macrophages, heterophils, and low numbers of reactive fibroblasts.                                                                                                  

Liver:  Multifocally and randomly, there are few variably sized foci which contain pale, enlarged hepatocytes (degeneration)  as well as eosinophilic material and basophilic karyorrhectic debris (necrosis) admixed with few to moderate numbers of macrophages, and heterophils and fewer lymphocytes.                                                                                                                      

Kidney:  No significant lesions.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  1. Trachea: Tracheitis, proliferative, lymphoplasmacytic, diffuse, moderate, with goblet cell hyperplasia and intraluminal adult nematodes, etiology consistent with Syngamus trachea, herring gull (Larus argentatus), avian.

2. Liver: Hepatitis, pyogranulomatous necrosis, multifocal, random, mild.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Tracheal syngamiasis

CAUSESyngamus trachea

SYNONYMS: Gapeworm, redworm, forked worm

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

LIFE CYCLE:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Anderson RC. The superfamily Strongyloidea. In: Anderson RC, ed. Nematode Parasites of Vertebrates. Wallingford, UK: CAB International; 1992:77-80.
  2. McDougald LR. Internal parasites. In: Swayne DE, ed. Diseases of Poultry. 13th ed. Ames, IA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing; 2013:1130-1131.
  3. Schmidt RE, Reavill DR, Phalen DN. Respiratory system. In: Pathology of Pet and Aviary Birds. 2nd ed. Ames, IA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing; 2015:32.
  4. Wallner-Pendleton E. Diseases of gamebirds. In: Boulianne M, ed.  Avian Disease Manual. 7th ed. Jacksonville, FL: American Association of Avian Pathologists, Inc.; 2013:237.
  5. Wehr EE. Nematodes. In: Davis JW, ed. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases of Wild Birds. 1st ed. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press; 1971:193-196.

 

 

 


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