JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
URINARY SYSTEM
January 2018
U-T02

Slide A

Signalment (AFIP #1796768):  Adult baboon (Papio sp.)

HISTORY:  Tissues from an adult baboon that was housed in an old, poorly-maintained facility.  The animal lost condition and developed convulsions shortly before dying.  A dark line was seen on the gums and mucous membranes were pale.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Kidney:  Multifocally, proximal tubule epithelial cell nuclei are enlarged 2 to 3 times normal size with marginated chromatin and contain 1 to 2, round to oval, 2 to 5 um in diameter, bright eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions.  Multifocally, few lymphocytes and plasma cells infiltrate the interstitium.

Liver:  Rarely, hepatic nuclei are enlarged 2 to 3 times normal size with marginated chromatin and contain 1 to 2, round to oval, 2 to 5 um in diameter, bright eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions.  Multifocally, few lymphocytes and plasma cells infiltrate the periportal connective tissue.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Kidney, proximal convoluted tubules:  Intranuclear inclusions, eosinophilic, few, baboon, nonhuman primate.

Liver, hepatocytes: Intranuclear inclusions, eosinophilic, rare.

Slide B

Signalment (89-197-3):  Hawai’i ‘amakihi (Hawaiian honeycreeper) (Hemignathus virens)

HISTORY:  Tissue from an Hawai’i ‘amakihi, which was off feed and had slowed responses to stimuli.  The animal eventually became lethargic, developed labored breathing, fell from its perch and was found dead.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Kidney:  Multifocally, proximal tubule epithelial cell nuclei are enlarged 2 times normal size by an amphophilic to light brown, irregular intranuclear inclusion, measuring up to 10 µm in diameter.  Multifocally, proximal tubule epithelial cells are swollen and have vacuolated cytoplasm (degeneration).

Ovary; uterus:  No significant findings.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Kidney, proximal convoluted tubules:  Intranuclear inclusions, amphophilic to light brown, few, with multifocal tubular degeneration, Hawai’i ‘amakihi (Hemignathus virens), avian.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Renal lead toxicosis (renal plumbism)

CAUSE:  Lead intoxication

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ULTRASTRUCTURAL FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

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  3. Cantile C, Youssef S. Nervous system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:316-317.
  4. Cianciolo RE, Mohr FC. Urinary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:430.
  5. Craig LE, Dittmer KE, Thompson KG. Bones and joints. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:86.
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  8. Fulton RM. Toxins and poisons. In: Swayne DE, ed. Diseases of Poultry. 13th ed.  Ames, IA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing; 2013:1295-1297.
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  10. Johnson, AL, Blaine ET, Lewis AD. Renal pigmentation due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Vet Pathol. 2015; 52(3): 576-579.
  11. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Environmental and nutritional diseases. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:410-412.
  12. LaDouceur EE, Kagan R, Scanlan M, Viner T. Chronically imbedded lead projectiles in wildlife: a case series investigating the potential for lead toxicosis. J Zoo Wildl Med.  2015 Jun;46(2):438-442.
  13. Lemos RAA, Driemeier D, Guimaraes EB, Dutra IS, Mori AE, Barros CSL. Lead poisoning in cattle grazing pasture contaminated by industrial waste. Vet Human Toxicol. 2004;46(6):326-328.
  14. Miller AD, Zachary JF. Nervous system. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby; 2017:854-855.
  15. Miller MA, Zachary JF. Mechanisms and morphology of cellular injury, adaptation, and death. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby; 2017:29-31.
  16. Nakade T, Tomura Y, Jin K, et al. Lead poisoning in Whooper and Tundra swans. J Wildl Dis. 2005;41(1):253-256.
  17. Rumbeiha WK, Braselton WE, Donch D. A retrospective study on the disappearance of blood lead in cattle with accidental lead toxicosis. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2001;13(5):373-378.
  18. Schmidt RE, Reavill DR, Phalen DN. Pathology of Pet and Aviary Birds.  2nd ed.  Ames, IA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc; 2015:194.
  19. Thompson LJ. Lead. In: Gupta RC, ed. Veterinary Toxicology: Basic and Clinical Principles. New York, NY: Elsevier; 2007:438-441.
  20. Valentine BA. Skeletal muscle. In: Zachary JF, McGavin MD, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby; 2017:940.

 


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