JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
SPECIAL SENSES
April 2018
S-M10

Signalment (AFIP Accession #2382810):  A cat

HISTORY:  Tissue from a cat with a history of dysphagia.  Large, fleshy masses were present in the ear and underneath the tongue.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Oropharyngeal mucosa (per contributor):  

Expanding the submucosal connective tissue and elevating the overlying mucosa is a polypoid mass that is composed of mature collagen interspersed with numerous small to medium caliber blood vessels.  Multifocally, there are small aggregates of inflammatory cells throughout the lesion composed of variable proportions of neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells, with fewer macrophages.  Multifocally, the collagen bundles are separated by clear spaces and lymphatics are moderately dilated (edema) and there is multifocal hemorrhage.  The mucosal epithelium is predominantly stratified squamous and forms multiple folds resembling papillary projections, with few areas of ciliated epithelium.  There is multifocal erosion and ulceration of the epithelium which is partially covered with eosinophilic debris and fibrin admixed with cellular and karyorrhectic debris (necrosis) as well as viable and degenerate neutrophils (serocellular crust).  

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Oropharyngeal mucosa (per contributor): Polyp, with chronic-active inflammation, erosion and ulceration, breed unspecified, feline.

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

For gross findings:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Allen HS, Broussard J, Noone K. Nasopharyngeal diseases in cats: a retrospective study of 53 cases (1991-1998). J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 1999;35:457-461.
  2. Caswell JL, Williams KJ. Respiratory System. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:477-478.
  3. Galloway PE, Kyles A, Henderson JP. Nasal polyps in a cat. J Small Anim Pract. 1997;38:78-80.
  4. Greci V, Mortellaro CM, Olivero D, Cocci A, Hawkins EC. Inflammatory polyps of the nasal turbinates of cats: an argument for designation as feline mesenchymal nasal hamartoma. J Feline Med Surg. 2011;13(4):213-9.
  5. Kudnig ST. Nasopharyngeal polyps in cats. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract. 2002;17(4):174-7. 
  6. Muilenburg RK, Fry TR. Feline nasopharyngeal polyps. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2002;32(4):839-49.
  7. Njaa BL: The Ear. In: Pathological Basis of Veterinary Disease. ed. Zachary JF, 6th ed. St. Louis, MO.; Mosby-Elsevier: 2017:1252-1253.
  8. Njaa BL: Special Senses. In: Jubb, Kennedy and Palmers Pathology of Domestic Animals. ed. Maxie MG, 6th ed., vol. 1, Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier-Saunders: 2016:498-499.
  9. Rosenblatt AJ, Zito SJ, Webster NS. Pathology in practice. What is Your Diagnosis? J Am Vet Med Assoc.  2014;244(1):37-39. 
  10. Wenzel AR, Wack AN, Beck SE, Bronson E.  Pathology in practice.  Nasal and nasopharyngeal polyps.  J Am Vet Med Assoc.  2012;241(7):885-87. Wilson DW. Tumors of the respiratory tract. In: Meuten DJ, ed. Tumors in Domestic Animals. 5th ed. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State Press; 2017:477.


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