JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
MARCH 2016
E-N07

Signalment (JPC #1697323):  An 11-year-old German shepherd dog

HISTORY:   Incidental finding

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION (Slide a):  Parathyroid gland:  Expanding and compressing the surrounding parathyroid parenchyma, there is a partially encapsulated, 5 x 7mm, densely cellular neoplasm composed of polygonal cells arranged in cords which often palisade around small caliber blood vessels (pseudorosettes), supported by a fine fibrovascular stroma.  Neoplastic cells have indistinct cell borders, scant amounts of finely granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm, and round, often antibasilar nuclei with finely stippled chromatin and 1-2 indistinct basophilic nucleoli.  Mitotic figures average 1 per 10 HPF.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Parathyroid gland:  Adenoma, German shepherd dog, canine.

Signalment (JPC #1877305):  An 11-year-old German shepherd dog

HISTORY:   This dog was in chronic renal failure.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION (Slide b):  Parathyroid gland:  Minimally compressing the adjacent thyroid gland are multiple hyperplastic parathyroid glands that are enlarged 2-3 times normal and are composed of a uniform population of densely packed hyperplastic chief cells arranged in nests and cords, supported by a fine fibrovascular stroma which extend to the glandular capsule.  Chief cells have indistinct cell borders with moderate amounts of pale eosinophilic cytoplasm with occasional distinct vacuoles.  Mitotic figures are rare.

Thyroid gland:  No significant lesions

Trachea:  Focally extensively there is mineralization of the tracheal cartilage (old age change).

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Parathyroid gland, multiple:  Hyperplasia, diffuse, moderate, German shepherd dog, canine.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Secondary hyperparathyroidism

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Barthold SW, Griffey SM, Percy DH. Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 4th ed. Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing; 2016:314.
  2. Craig LE, Dittmer KE, Thompson KG. Bones and joints. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1, 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier-Saunders; 2016:61-63,74-80.
  3. Feldman E, Nelson R. Canine and Feline Endocrinology and Reproduction. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders;2003:660-715.
  4. Ferguson DC, Hoenig M. Endocrine system. In: Latimer KS, ed. Duncan and Prasse’s Veterinary Laboratory Medicine Clinical Pathology. 5th ed. Ames, IA:Iowa State University Press; 2003:295-304.
  5. Miller MA. Endocrine System. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:703-704.
  6. Pope JP, Steeil J, Ramsay EC, et al. Spontaneous Proliferative and Neoplastic Lesions in Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands of Nondomestic Felids. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2017;29(1):8-13.
  7. Rosol TJ, Grone A. Endocrine glands. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 3. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier-Saunders; 2016:299-309.
  8. Stockham SL, Scott MA. Fundamentals of Veterinary Clinical Pathology. 2nd ed., Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing Professional;2008:593-638.


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