JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY

INTEGUMENT SYSTEM

October 2016

I-P05 (NP)

 

Signalment (JPC 994833):  Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

HISTORY:  None

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Mucosa and haired skin, nares:  Multifocally, the mucosal epithelium is ulcerated and contains numerous intraepithelial tunnels with multiple tangential and cross-sections of 100-200 µm diameter, adult female and male nematodes.  Nematodes have a 2 µm wide cuticle, paired bacillary bands, a pseudocoelom, stichosome, polymyarian-coelomyarian musculature and either a testis with sperm or a uterus with larvae. The mucosal epithelium exhibits spongiosis, hydropic degeneration, and transmigrating neutrophils. Multifocally within the subepithelial connective tissue and the dermis, there are numerous perivascular viable and degenerate neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, fewer eosinophils, and macrophages.  Rarely, previously described adult nematodes are within lymphatics. Diffusely there is an exudate composed of many sloughed epithelial cells, degenerate neutrophils, abundant mucus, necrotic debris, and hemorrhage with few colonies of mixed bacteria and 50 x 75 µm, bi-operculate, embryonated nematode eggs with 3 µm wide, yellow, anisotropic shells. Within the epidermis, there is a focally extensive, mild parakeratotic hyperkeratosis with an intracorneal pustule composed of numerous viable and degenerate neutrophils, necrotic debris, and serum.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Mucosa and haired skin, nares:  Rhinitis and dermatitis, ulcerative, neutrophilic and lymphoplasmacytic, multifocal, moderate, with intraepithelial and intralymphatic adult nematodes and rare eggs, etiology consistent with Anatrichosoma sp., Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis), nonhuman primate.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Nasal anatrichosomiasis

CAUSE:  Anatrichosoma sp.

GENERAL DISCUSSION: 

PATHOGENESIS: 

LIFE CYCLE:

TYPICAL CLINICAL/GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS: 

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: 

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY: 

Intraepithelial nematodes in animals:

REFERENCES:

  1. Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research Diseases. Vol 2. 2nd San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2012: 245-246,575.
  2. Bleier T, Huetzel U, Bauder C, Behlert O, Burkhardt E. Gongylonema pulchrum infection and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a vari (Lemur macaca variegata; Kehr 1792). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2005;36(2):342-345.
  3. Bowman DD. Georgis' Parasitology for Veterinarians. 10th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2014: 227, 429.
  4. Calle PP, Joslin JO. Chapter 37 New World and Old World Monkeys. In: Miller RE, Fowler M, eds. Fowler’s Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine. Vol 8. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2015: 312.
  5. Gardiner CH, Poynton SL. An Atlas of Metazoan Parasites in Animal Tissues. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 1999: 40-43.
  6. Maudlin EA, Peters-Kennedy J. Integumentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: 690.  
  7. Meyers WM. Pathology of Infectious Diseases. 1. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 2000: 367.
  8. Miller WH, Griffin CE, Campbell KL. Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders; 2013:291.
  9. Noden BH, Du Plessis EC, Morkel C, Tubbesing U, Soni M. Bowman DD. Anatrichosoma sp. in the footpads of a cat: diagnosis and pathology of Namibian case. Vet Parasitol. 2013; 191 (3-4):386-389.
  10. Ramiro-Ibanez F, Winston J, O'Donnell E, Mansell J. Ulcerative pododermatitis in a cat associated with Anatrichosoma J Vet Diagn Invest. 2002; 14(1):80-83.


Click the slide to view.



Click on image for diagnostic series.



Back | Home | Contact Us | Links | Help |