JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

October 2017

P-V02

 

Signalment (JPC #1506681): Monkey

HISTORY: One of 16 monkeys that had a skin rash

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION: Lung: Diffusely expanding the alveolar septa and filling alveolar lumina is abundant fibrin, edema and small amounts of necrotic debris admixed with moderate numbers of degenerate neutrophils, macrophages, fewer lymphocytes and plasma cells. There is necrosis and loss of type I pneumocytes and alveolar septa are lined by hyperplastic II pneumocytes. Multifocally within alveolar septa and lumina, alveolar pneumocytes and macrophages form syncytial cells containing numerous vesiculate nuclei with multiple 7-10 um eosinophilic intranuclear and cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies. There is perivascular edema, and bronchial epithelium exhibits one of the following changes: attenuation, necrosis, loss or hyperplasia. The pleura is covered by a 50 um thick plaque composed of fibrin, degenerate neutrophils and mild hemorrhage.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS: Lung: Pneumonia, bronchointerstitial, fibrinonecrotic, diffuse, severe, with fibrinosuppurative pleuritis, and syncytial giant cells with intranuclear and cytoplasmic eosinophilic viral inclusions, species unspecified, nonhuman primate

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS: Morbilliviral pneumonia 

CAUSE: Measles (Rubeola) virus

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Old World primates:

New World primates:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

Old World primates:

New World primates:

 TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ULTRASTRUCTURAL FINDINGS:

 DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

Nonhuman primates with bronchointerstitial pneumonia

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:  

References:

  1. Bailey C, Mansfield K. Emerging and reemerging infectious disease of nonhuman primates in laboratory setting. Vet Pathol. 2010; 47(3):462-481. 
  2. Caswell JL, Williams KJ. Respiratory system. In: Maxie MG, ed., Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol. 2. 6th Philadelphia, PA:Elsevier Saunders; 2016:574-576.
  3. Lowenstine LJ. Measles virus infection, nonhuman primates. In: Jones TC, Mohr U, Hunt RD, eds., Monographs On Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Nonhuman Primates. Vol 1. Washington, DC:Springer-Verlag, International Life Sciences Institute; 1993:33.
  4. Lowenstine LJ, Osborn KG. Respiratory system diseases. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T, eds., Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research, Diseases. San Diego, CA:Academic Press; 2012:445-446.
  5. Kramer JA, Bielitzki J. Integumentary system diseases. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T, eds., Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research, Diseases. San Diego, CA:Academic Press; 2012:570-571.
  6. Wachtman L, Mansfield K. Viral diseases. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T, eds., Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research, Diseases. San Diego, CA:Academic Press; 2012:43-46.
  7. Yanagi Y, Takeda M, Ohno S. Measles virus: cellular receptors, tropism and pathogenesis. J Gen Virol. 2006; 87(10):2767-79.
  8. Zachary JF. Mechanisms of microbial infections. In: Zachary JF, ed., Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th St. Louis, MO:Mosby Elsevier, 2017:225-226.

 

 


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