JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
November 2018
D-V23 (NP)

Signalment (JPC #2317372):  Female rhesus monkey

HISTORY:  This animal was experimentally infected six days before death.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Liver:  There is marked, diffuse midzonal necrosis of hepatocytes characterized by disorganized hepatic chords composed of shrunken, hypereosinophilic cells with pyknotic nuclei or abundant, eosinophilic, granular to globular cellular and karyorrhectic debris.  There are scattered intracytoplasmic, intensely eosinophilic (acidophilic), irregularly round, 5-25 um diameter inclusions (Councilman bodies or cytosegrosomes).  Hepatocytes adjacent to areas of necrosis are swollen with pale vacuolated cytoplasm (degeneration).  Remaining centrilobular and periportal hepatocytes have slightly basophilic vacuolated cytoplasm, vesiculate nuclei, and a prominent central nucleolus.  Scattered throughout the hepatic parenchyma are few neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages.  There are few periportal and centrilobular aggregates of lymphocytes, macrophages and fewer neutrophils.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Liver:  Hepatocellular necrosis and degeneration, midzonal, diffuse, severe, with acidophilic Councilman bodies, rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), non-human primate.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Flaviviral hepatocellular necrosis

CAUSE:  Yellow fever virus (flavivirus)

CONDITION:  Yellow Fever

GENERAL DISCUSSION

PATHOGENESIS

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Hemorrhagic fever viruses:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY

REFERENCES:

  1. Balasuriya UBR, Reisen W, Towner J. Flaviviridae. In: MacLachlan NJ, Dubovi EJ, eds. Fenner’s Veterinary Virology. 4th ed. San Diego, CA: Elsevier; 2017:531-537.
  2. Bearcraft WGC. The histopathology of the liver of yellow fever infected rhesus monkeys. J Pathol Bact. 1957:74;295-303.
  3. Paules CL, Fauci AS. Yellow fever – once again on the radar screen in the Americas. N Engl J Med. 2017; 376(15):1397-1399.
  4. Tesh RB, Guzman H, Travassos da Rosa APA, Vasconcelos PFC, DIas LB, Bunnell JE, Zhang H, Xiao S. Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus): Virologic, biologic, and immunologic studies. J Inf Dis.  2001:183;1431-1436.
  5. Tomori O. Yellow fever: the recurring plague. Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences.  2004:41;391- 428.
  6. Wachtman L, Mansfield K. Viral diseases of nonhuman primates. In: Abee CR, Mansfield K, Tardif S, Morris T, eds. Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases. 2. 2nd ed. San Diego, CA: Elsevier; 2012:50-51.
  7. Xiao S, Zhang H, Guzman H, Tesh RB. Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) II. Pathology. J Inf Dis. 2001:183;1437-1444.


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