JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM
May 2019
C-V01 (NP)

SIGNALMENT (JPC #2014367):  A 5-week-old Labrador retriever

HISTORY:  None

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Heart: Multifocally low number of cardiomyocytes are lost and replaced by loosely arranged, thin bands of edematous collagen, small amounts of fibrin,l edema and few lymphocytes and rare plasma cells.  Adjacent cardiomyocytes are often shrunken with normal cell architecture (atrophy), occasionally swollen and vacuolated (degeneration), or rarely are shrunken and fragmented, with loss of cross striations and hypereosinophilic sarcoplasm (necrosis).  Multifocally low numbers of cardiomyocyte nuclei contain a 5-10 um diameter intranuclear inclusion body that is either basophilic and completely fills the nucleus, or is eosinophilic and surrounded by a 1-2 um clear halo and marginated chromatin.  Diffusely the endomysial fibrous connective tissue is mildly expanded by clear space and beaded eosinophilic proteinaceous fluid (edema).

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Heart:  Myocarditis, lymphoplasmacytic, chronic, multifocal, moderate, with cardiomyocyte atrophy, degeneration, necrosis, and loss, and intranuclear inclusion bodies, Labrador retriever, canine.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Parvoviral myocarditis

CAUSE:  Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2)

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ULTRASTRUCTURAL FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Barthold SW, Griffey SM, Percy DH. Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 4th Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing; 2016:17-19, 122-124, 175-176.
  2. Ford J, McEndaffer L, Renshaw R, et al. Parvovirus Infection Is Associated With Myocarditis and Myocardial Fibrosis in Young Dogs. Vet Pathol. 2017:54(6):964-971.
  3. Gjeltema J, Murphy H, Rivera S. Clinical canine parvovirus type 2c infection in a group of Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2015;46(1):120-123.
  4. Greene CE, Decaro N. Canine viral enteritis. In: Greene CE ed. Infectious Diseases of the Dog and Cat. 4th ed. St. Louis MO: Elsevier Saunders.  2012: 67-76.
  5. McKnight CA, Maes RK, Wise AG, Kiupel M. Evaluation of tongue as a complementary sample for diagnosis of parvovoiral infection in dogs and cats. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2007;4:409-413.
  6. Miller LM, Gal A. Cardiovascular System and Lymphatic Vessels. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:609.
  7. Palya VJ. Parvovirus infections of waterfowl. In: Swayne DE, Glisson JR, McDougald LR, Nolan LK, Suarez DL, Nair V eds. Disease of Poultry 13th ed. Ames, IA; John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2013:444-451.
  8. Robinson WF, Robinson NA. Cardiovascular System. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 3. 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:34.
  9. Steinel A, Parrish CR, Bloom ME, Truyen U. Parvovirus infections in wild carnivores. J Wildl Dis. 2001;37:594-607.
  10. Uzal FA, Plattner BL, Hostetter JM: Alimentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:153-158.
  11. Zsak L. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys. In: Swayne DE, Glisson JR, McDougald LR, Nolan LK, Suarez DL, Nair V eds. Disease of Poultry 13th ed. Ames, IA; John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2013:399-405.


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