JPCSYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
November 2018
D-V11

Signalment (JPC #1210479):  An ox

HISTORY:  None.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Superficial oral mucosa:  Diffusely, the stratum spinosum is markedly expanded and fragmented by numerous vesicles and pustules which measure up to 500 mm in diameter.  Vesicles contain homogenous amorphous eosinophilic and karyorrhectic debris (necrosis) and beaded fibrillar material (fibrin), while pustules also contain moderate numbers of viable and degenerate neutrophils, fewer lymphocytes and plasma cells and eosinophils.  These inflammatory cells infiltrate the adjacent stratum spinosum which also exhibits multifocal epithelial intracellular edema (hydropic degeneration).  Multifocally, there are chains of cocci, filamentous bacilli and plant material adhered to the epithelium.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Oral mucosa:  Stomatitis, vesicular and necrotizing, acute, diffuse, severe, breed not specified, bovine.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Rhabdoviral stomatitis

CAUSE:  Vesicular stomatitis virus (rhabdovirus)

CONDITION:  Vesicular stomatitis (VS)

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

mouth, coronary bands and teats

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ULTRASTRUCTURAL FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

Vesicular diseases of cattle:

Vesicular diseases of pigs:

Erosive diseases of cattle:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

Disease

Cause

Ruminant

Swine

Horse

Foot-and-mouth disease

Aphthovirus

+

+

--

Swine vesicular disease

Enterovirus

--

+

--

Vesicular stomatitis

Rhabdovirus

+

+

+

Vesicular exanthema of swine

Calicivirus

--

+

--

Seneca virus disease

Senecavirus

?

+

?

 

REFERENCES:

  1. Berminger ML, O’Hearn E, Lomkin R, Newens K, Havas KA. A post-infection serologic assessment of cattle herd immune status after a vesicular stomatitis outbreak and the agreement of antibody assays. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2018:30(4):510-516.
  2. Cargnelutti JF, Olinda RG, Maia LA, et al. Outbreaks of vesicular stomatitis Alagoas virus in horses and cattle in northeastern Brazil. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2014;26(6):788-794.
  3. Gelberg HB. Alimentary system and the peritoneum, omentum, mesentery and peritoneal cavity. In: McGavin MD, Zachary JF, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby; 2017:345-347.
  4. Mesquita LP, Bruhn FRP, Majorka PC, Howerth EW. Expression Kinetics of RANTES and MCP-1 in the Brain of Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) Infected with Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus. J Comp Pathol. 2016:155(4):326-338.
  5. Mesquita LP, Diaz MH, Howerth EW, et al. Pathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus Infection in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) Transmitted by Black Flies (Simulium vittatum). Vet Pathol. 2017:54(1):74-81.
  6. Segales J, Barcellos D, Alfieri A, Burrough E, Marthaler D. Senecavirus A: A Emerging Pathogen Causing Vesicular Disease and Mortality in Pigs? Vet Pathol. 2017:54(1):11-21.
  7. Uzal FA, Plattner BL, Hostetter JM. Alimentary system. In: Maxie MG, eds. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2015:117-158.
  8. Zachary JF. Mechanisms of microbial infections. In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:200, 227.


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