JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

September 2017

P-N01 (NP)

 

Signalment (JPC 95/96 16-1):  Dog, age, sex and breed not specified

HISTORY:  This dog presented for congested respiration and trouble barking.  There was transient intermittent response to steroids, bronchodilators, and antibiotics.  Several months later, signs had progressed to dyspnea, inspiratory stridor, vomiting, and activity-induced cyanosis.  Thoracic radiographs revealed normal appearing lungs and a soft tissue density in the laryngeal area.  Laryngeal examination showed a 2-3 cm mass displacing the left side of the larynx.  The animal was euthanized and the laryngeal block submitted for histopathological examination.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Submucosa, perilaryngeal area (per contributor):  Markedly expanding the submucosa and elevating the mucosa is a 1.8 x 1.9 cm, unencapsulated, densely cellular, lobular neoplasm composed of large, brightly eosinophilic, polygonal cells, arranged in solidly cellular areas and vague streams, separated by thin bands of fibrous stroma.  Neoplastic cells have variably distinct cell borders, moderate to abundant amounts of granular and occasionally vacuolated cytoplasm, and round to oval nuclei with finely stippled chromatin and 1-2 variably distinct nucleoli.  Multifocally, there are elongate binucleate strap-like cells and multinucleate polygonal cells.  There is moderate anisocytosis and anisokaryosis.  Mitoses average 1 per 10 high power fields.  There is multifocal hemorrhage, hemosiderin-laden macrophages, and single cell necrosis.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSES:  Submucosa, perilaryngeal area (per contributor):  Rhabdomyoma, breed not specified, canine

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS: 

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS: 

ULTRASTRUCTURE:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: 

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: 

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY: 

REFERENCES:

  1. Caswell JL, Williams KJ. Respiratory system. In: Maxie MG ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol. 2. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:479,482.
  2. Cooper BJ, Valentine BA. Tumors of muscle. In: Meuten DJ, ed. Tumors in Domestic Animals. 5th Ames, IA: Wiley Blackwell; 2017:444-466.
  3. Cooper BJ, Valentine BA. Muscle and tendon. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol. 1 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:(1):241-242, 726, (3):52.
  4. Dunbar MD, Ginn P, Winter M, Miller KB, Craft W. Laryngeal rhabdomyoma in a dog. Vet Clin Pathol. 2012 Dec;41(4):590-593.
  5. Dungworth DL, Hauser B, Hahn FF, Wilson DW, Haenichen T, Harkema JR. Histological classification of tumors of the respiratory system of domestic animals. In: Schulman FY, ed., World Health Organization International Classification of Tumors of Domestic Animals, 2nd series. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology 1999;VI:23-25,34-35,48-49.
  6. Lopez A., Martinson SA. Respiratory system, mediastinum, and pleurae. In: Zachary JF, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:591,931-931.
  7. Mills SE, Gaffey MJ, Frierson HF. Tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and ear. In: Atlas of Tumor Pathology, 3rd series. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 1997:fascicle 26:322-327.
  8. Radi ZA, Metz A. Canine Cardiac Rhabdomyoma. Toxicol Pathol. 2009;37(3):348-350.
  9. Robinson WF, Robinson NA. Cardiovascular system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 3. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:52.


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