JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
URINARY
January 2018
U-P08

Signalment (NADC WCS 2-03):  Pig, age and gender unspecified

HISTORY:  Unknown

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Ureter and adjacent fibroadipose tissue: The periureteral connective tissue is expanded by multifocal to coalescing, up to 1 cm diameter granulomas that contain a tangential section of an adult nematode surrounded by a central area of proteinaceous fluid and abundant granular, eosinophilic cellular and karyorrhectic debris (lytic necrosis) admixed with abundant viable and degenerate eosinophils, fewer lymphocytes, plasma cells, neutrophils, and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. The inflammation and necrosis is further surrounded by granulation tissue and fibrosis. The sections of adult nematodes are 1 x 3 mm with a thick smooth cuticle, platymyarian-meromyarian musculature, large vacuolated lateral cords, pseudocoelom, a large intestinal tract lined by few multinucleate cells with a dense tall microvillous brush border (strongyle intestine), and a reproductive tract containing 60 x 70 micron elliptical morulated thin shelled eggs. The parasite intestinal lumen contains degenerate eosinophils mixed with cellular debris. Diffusely there is mild congestion, occasional hemorrhage, and mild dilation of lymphatics.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Periureteral fibroadipose tissue: Granulomas, eosinophilic, multiple, with adult strongylid nematodes, breed not specified, porcine.

ETIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Periureteral stephanuriasis

CAUSE:  Stephanurus dentatus

CONDITION:  Kidney worm of swine

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

LIFE CYCLE: 

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: 

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY: 

References:

  1. Bowman DD. In: Bowman DD, ed. Georgis’ Parasitology for Veterinarians. 10th ed. St. Louis, MO: Saunders Elsevier; 2013:178.
  2. Breshears MA, Confer AW. The urinary system, In: Zachary JF, ed. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2016:675.
  3. Cantile C, Youssef S. Nervous system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:391
  4. Cianciolo RE, Mohr FC. Urinary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer"s Pathology of Domestic Animals. 6th ed. Vol 2. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders;2016:442.
  5. Constable PD, Hinchcliff KW, Done SH, Grünberg W. Veterinary Medicine: A Textbook of the Diseases of Cattle, Sheep, Pigs, Goats and Horses. 11th ed. London, England, UK: WB Saunders Company LTD; 2017:1134-1135.
  6. Cullen JM, Stalker MJ. Liver and biliary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 1. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:319.
  7. Gardiner CH, Poynton SL. An Atlas of Metazoan Parasites in Animal Tissues. Washington, D.C.: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 1999:8,13,21,24.
  8. Greve JH. Internal parasites: helminths. In: Zimmerman JJ, Karriker LA, Ramirez A, Schwartz KJ, Stevenson GW, eds. Diseases of Swine. 10th ed.  Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing; 2012: 916-917.
  9. Uzal FA, Plattner BL, Hostetter JM. Alimentary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:255.
  10. Eustrongylidosis, In: Friden M, Franson JC, Cigavonich EA. eds. Field Manual of Wildlife diseases, general field procedures and diseases of birds. Madison, WI: U.S. Geological Survey;1999;:223-225.

 


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