JPC SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
February 2019
E-N12 (NP)

SIGNALMENT (JPC #2017861):  8-year-old male Irish setter

HISTORY:  This dog had a well-vascularized, deep orange-brown mass at the ileocecal junction.

HISTOPATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION:  Ileocecal junction:  Multifocally infiltrating the submucosa and muscular tunics and extending to cut margins is an unencapsulated, poorly circumscribed, 1.5 x 2.5 cm, multilobular neoplasm composed of polygonal cells arranged in cords, nests, packets, and more solidly cellular areas separated by variably thick, fibrovascular septa.  Neoplastic cells have indistinct cell borders, moderate amounts of eosinophilic finely granular cytoplasm, round-to-oval nuclei that are vesiculate or contain coarsely clumped chromatin, and one variably distinct nucleolus.  Mitoses average 1 per 10 HPF.  Multifocally, neoplastic cells infiltrate the muscular tunics and are located within numerous vessels.  Within the submucosa are low numbers of lymphocytes and hemosiderin-laden macrophages, and lymphatics are multifocally ectatic (edema).  There are multifocal areas with hemorrhage, clear acicular clefts (cholesterol clefts) and single cell necrosis.

MORPHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:  Ileocecal junction:  Carcinoid, Irish setter, canine.

SYNONYM:  Neuroendocrine carcinoma

GENERAL DISCUSSION:

PATHOGENESIS:

TYPICAL CLINICAL FINDINGS:

TYPICAL GROSS FINDINGS:

TYPICAL LIGHT MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS:

ULTRASTRUCTURE:

ADDITIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS:

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS:

For histologic findings: 

COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY:

REFERENCES:

  1. Albers TM, Alroy J, McDonnell JJ, Moore AS. A poorly differentiated gastric carcinoid in a dog. J Vet Diagn Invest. 1998;10:116-118.
  2. Brown DL, Van Wettere AJ, Cullen JM. Hepatobiliary system and exocrine pancreas. In: McGavin MD, Zachary JF, eds. Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017: 445.
  3. Caswell JL, Williams KJ. Respiratory system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Limited; 2016: 497-498.
  4. Cullen JM, Stalker MJ. Liver and biliary system. In: Maxie MG, ed. Jubb, Kennedy, and Palmer’s Pathology of Domestic Animals. Vol 2. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Limited; 2016: 349.
  5. Lippo NJ, Williams JE, Brawer RS, Sobel KE. Acute hemobilia and hemocholecyst in 2 dogs with gallbladder carcinoid. J Vet Intern Med. 2008;22:1249-1252.
  6. Majka JA, Sher S. Spontaneous gastric carcinoid tumor in an aged Sprague-Dawley rat. Vet Pathol. 1989;26:88-90.
  7. Meuten DJ. Tumors in Domestic Animals, 5th ed. Ames, IA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; 2017:473.
  8. Michishita M, Takahashi K, Moriya H, Nakamura S, Koyama H, Sako T. Poorly differentiated rectal carcinoid in a cow. Vet Pathol. 2007;44:414-417.
  9. Morrell CN, Volk MV, Mankowski JL. A carcinoid tumor in the gallbladder of a dog. Vet Pathol. 2002;39:756-758.
  10. Sako T, et al. Immunohistochemical evaluation of a malignant intestinal carcinoid in a dog. Vet Pathol. 2003;40:212-215.
  11. Sykes GP, Cooper BJ. Canine intestinal carcinoids. Vet Pathol. 1982;19:120-131.
  12. van Maanen C, Klein WR, Dik KJ, van den Ingh TSGAM. Three cases of carcinoid in the equine nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses: Histologic and immunohistochemical features. Vet Pathol. 1996;33:92-95.


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